Create a Children’s Corner: Why It’s Important, and How to Do It in a Small Home

Create a Children’s Corner: Why It’s Important, and How to Do It in a Small Home

Parents must remember that it's also important to foster our kids’ independence and give them room to grow. That’s why even young children need to have their own room – or at the very least, a special nook they can call their own!
 

7 min read

Why kids need time alone and a space of their own 

That’s why even young children need to have their own room – or at the very least, a special nook they can call their own. It can be a corner of the living room, a window seat, or a partitioned play area. 
 
What’s important isn’t the size of the area, but how you treat it and respect it as your kids’ personal space. “By not giving your child a place of her own -- a simple space in which she can emote, do inner work, and most importantly, be private -- you are telling her, in so many words, that she can't be trusted,” says Dr. Gail Gross, a human behavior, parenting and education expert.

Secondly, don’t focus on how that area looks, but how your children feel when they’re there. Dyan Robson, author and advocate for children with special needs, calls it a Calm Down Corner. “It’s a safe space for kids to go when they need to relax, recharge, or even release their pent-up anger or frustration.” 
 

With a little creativity, you can put together a fun area for your children to call their own.
Here are some simple tips to help you get started!
 
Find a corner 
Do you have limited space? Don’t worry, you just need to get creative. Some potential children’s nooks: alcoves with windows, the unused top of a bunk bed, an empty corner of the living room, the wall end of any long hallway, a spare closet, or even a safe space under your stairs. 

Pick a color palette 
It’s amazing how a dreary, boring corner can look happy and vibrant with just a fresh coat of paint. You can find color palettes on Pinterest, but do consider the psychological effect of certain colors on children’s mood and behavior. Green and blue promote peace and boost creativity, while browns and beiges feel safe and protective. Brighter shades like orange, red, and pink can increase energy but can also overstimulate your child. Consider using these strong colors as accents instead.

Put the “fun” back in functional
 
Don’t just toss a foldable table in the corner and call it a day. The more effort you put into making your child’s space pretty and inviting, the more they will enjoy it and be motivated to care for it and maintain it. 

For seating, try a visually appealing area rug, bean bags or huge cushions. Get a table with inner storage and low-lying shelves for books and art supplies. You can ask a carpenter to make one for you, and paint it to match the rest of the corner. Be sure your children can easily get and return whatever item they need. This gives them more freedom, and also makes them responsible for tidying up after they’re done.

Make use of wall space 

Add hooks to the wall and hang canvas bags to store bulky toys or accessories. Get a magnetic board for displaying art work and photos, or use twine and clothes pins. (Just consider your child’s age, because small magnets and pins can be choking hazards.) You can even paint one section with chalkboard paint and turn an entire wall into their canvas. 

Creative a sense of privacy with curtains or canopies 

If your kid-friendly space is in a common area, you can still give them a sense of privacy with curtains or lightweight cloth canopies. These can serve as a makeshift doorway for an alcove or closet, or as dividers in a room shared by two children. Or, buy a small cloth teepee for your child to play in. 

Provide comfort and creative outlets
Make this a fun, special place where your child can play, learn and relax:

  • Favorite stuffed toys
  • Books and activity books
  • Engaging one-person activities like puzzles and building blocks
  • Art supplies
  • Fidget toys or stress balls to squeeze and manipulate
  • Music player (some children find it relaxing to have a white noise machine or to use noise-reducing headphones)

Involve your child in the process
Professional designers always say that the key to creating a good space is understanding what your client likes. The same is true even if your client is just three or four years old. Interview your kids or show them examples and see what stands out to them. You can ask them fun questions like “Do you prefer the color of a lemon or the color of the clouds?” This interview is a fun part of the process and one way of getting to know your children better to ensure you create a space that is perfect for them.

Space and room to grow

Children won’t care if they don’t have a big room or expensive furniture. They’d be happy just to have “My Own Space” where they feel free and safe. Whether it’s a corner or the end of corridor, they will think it’s special because it’s theirs.  

 

The views and opinions expressed by the writer are his/her own, and does not state or reflect those of Wyeth Nutrition and its principals.

Reference

About The Writer

 

Michelle K. AlejandroMichelle K. Alejandro
 

Michelle is a professional writer, photographer, and content creator. Her work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, and online platforms around the globe. She has extensive experience writing articles covering lifestyle, health and wellness, family, parenting, and interior and event styling. She is the founder and author of the blog www.peanutbutterandglitter.com. In her spare time, Michelle loves to travel, spend time with her family, and go on fun and creative adventures with her daughter.

 

 

 

The views and opinions expressed by the writer are his/her own, and does not state or reflect those of Wyeth Nutrition and its principals.

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